Black Friday: 3 Solidarity Alternatives

Black Friday, which originated in the United States in the 1950s, marks the start of Christmas shopping the day after Thanksgiving. But this day has also become the symbol of excessive consumption throughout the world. That's why some groups and associations are calling to replace this over-consumption with gestures of solidarity and generosity. We suggest you discover three solidarity alternatives to Black Friday.

What is the problem?

With global warming, more and more of us are aware of the harmful consequences of excessive consumption throughout the year and especially during Black Friday!

Many people realize that this day of promotions is an incentive to buy things they don't necessarily need...

This time of year is one for a real shopping spree, especially since Black Friday has been followed since 2005 by Cyber Monday, which consists of even more online promotions...

That's why those who resist this overconsumption have decided to organize alternative events during November.

Circular Monday

This initiative originated in Sweden and has now been exported to several countries.

It is organised on the Monday before Black Friday to encourage the circular economy by promoting alternatives to buying new, such as:
- favouring second-hand purchases
- preferring recycled materials
- opting for equipment rental
- having one's objects repaired.

The organizers of this Circular Monday encourage participants to post a photo of the corresponding products on social networks with the hashtag #circularmonday.

Green or Blue Friday

In France, people who want to denounce the excessive and unreasonable consumption associated with Black Friday have created the Green Friday movement.

This collective, which brings together more than 500 people including retailers, calls for a boycott of Black Friday and a preference for more local and sustainable options.

Businesses that want to join this movement and display the Green Friday logo must meet certain conditions such as:
- promoting responsible consumption
- not running any promotions on Black Friday
- donate 10% of the profits from this day to a charity.

Participating merchants stress that if you really want to increase your purchasing power it is better to buy less but better.

This includes preferring quality products made with respect for the environment and human beings or second-hand products.

To note: in a comparable move, some companies have launched Blue Friday. Instead of offering discounts, these brands donate 20% of purchases made that day to associations that clean the oceans.

Giving Tuesday

This movement also known as Giving Tuesday or Giving Tuesday was born in 2012 in the United States. It has been exported to over 100 countries.

The Giving Tuesday is held on the Tuesday after Black Friday and is presented as the global day of generosity and solidarity.

The movement encourages citizens, businesses and organizations to give donations of all kinds for the benefit of the less fortunate.

To note: in 2021, this movement puts youth in the spotlight by creating Giving Tuesday NextGen to highlight the actions of 18-25 year olds, an age group that has been particularly affected by the health crisis and the economic crisis.

On this Tuesday, which falls today, you can for example:
- make in-kind donations
- donate food
- donate your time
- donate blood
- donate to associations

There are 1000 ways to be generous to those in need, so it's up to you to find yours!

Author: Audrey
Copyright image: greenfriday.fr
Tags: Black Friday, Giving Tuesday, Solidarity, consumption, Green, United States, symbol, charity, stress, purchasing power, human, NextGen, olds, HEALTH, economic crisis, in-kind donations, food, sustainable, boycott, France, Thanksgiving, over-consumption, global warming, Cyber Monday, overconsumption, Sweden, circular economy, equipment rental, social networks, hashtag, Christmas shopping, donate blood,
In French: Black Friday : 3 alternatives solidaires
En español: Black Friday: 3 alternativas solidarias
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